James “Two Gun” Davis

The slimy and corrupt police chief of Los Angeles

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L.A. Police Chief. Pretty much despises Michael Feare. In 1933, he was backing an up and coming mayoral candidate Frank Shaw for a big promise of a budget raise for the entire force. However, Feare and his detectives weren’t aware of this, and cracked a significant racketeering problem that made the police look foolish at a critical time during the election (when Shaw was selling the LAPD high under a slogan of stamping out organized crime). Shaw subsequently revoked his pact with Davis and then went on to win the election.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_E._Davis

“Cindy” case involvement

Davis made several appearances throughout the “Cindy” case. Firstly, Davis was a very reluctant speaker at the L.A. City Hall’s award ceremony for Feare and his agents after they provided critical support in removing several O’Malley gang members from the streets in a gunfight.

Davis made a second appearance at the warehouse where John McKenzie and Philip Marlowe killed several assailants who were linked to the O’Malley brothers’ getaway (a loose end that would haunt Feare’s agency if they wasn’t dealt with). Davis arrived on the scene immediately after the gunfight, where he put McKenzie and Marlowe under arrest. He intended to lock away the two detectives for their miscreant involvement. When Michael Feare arrived, Davis mocked him, and suggested to Feare that the LAPD would be taking the situation from there on out. This would effectively stain Feare’s agency and deprive it of both of its street detectives, ruining Michael Feare’s business in the process.

When Davis was dealing with the investigation, Feare crept around behind the warehouse to find the getaway vehicle, loaded with narcotics. This struck an idea, and when Feare returned to speak with the unwary Davis, Michael played along in an act of submission, granting Davis the drug bust. Feare sold the idea of a secret LAPD drug sting that would likely impress L.A. Mayor Shaw. Feare’s only request was for Davis to let his detectives go after their night in jail. Davis liked the idea, and agreed. Feare then mentioned that Davis’ men might now get the extra funding Davis had been yearning for, to which chief Davis replied with “Fuck you, Feare”.

After McKenzie and Marlowe discovered the truth of the Asylum operation north of L.A. and Heinrich Hersteller was killed by Feare in Michael’s very own apartment, Davis took the utmost interest in the alert that gunshots had been heard at Feare’s complex. Davis arrived on the scene, discovering that a body lay dead in Michael Feare’s living room. He happily had Feare arrested and detained at the LAPD’s headquarters. When Feare revealed the Asylum operation went unnoticed for years under L.A.’s nose, Davis was taken aback due to his fear that Mayor Shaw would punish him for letting such a heinous operation run amok for so long (a parallel to the major racketeering blunder the LAPD suffered only a couple years prior).

Davis and Feare then struck another mutual compromise outside of the Law, but this time the stakes were much higher. Feare would not be charged with the murder of Professor Hersteller so long as he never spoke out of the Asylum operation and heeded that his detectives do the same. Davis would have Hersteller’s body unlawfully disposed of and label the killing as justified self-defense in reaction to armed robbery. Hersteller’s name would not be reported, and instead replaced with another name. Davis would also see that all of the evidence Feare’s agents had gathered about the case and those involved was destroyed. The cost of this scandal would seemingly be high, and at the assumption that many bribes would need to be put in place.

James “Two Gun” Davis

The City of a Thousand Crimes AaronWinfield